Perspectives of mental health difficulties within employment today

Perspectives of mental health difficulties within employment today

Tuesday, 9th of May

Perspectives of mental health difficulties within employment today

To gain real insight into people’s perspectives of mental health difficulties within employment today, we asked our Bright Futures network and MyKindaFuture offices to anonymously complete a questionnaire aiming to gather honest and true perceptions of the topic. From the responses gathered, the following data was collected:

  • 22% reported having been formally diagnosed with a mental health problem, and 29% reported having experienced mental health difficulties without a formal diagnosis.
  • If aware that a manager was suffering with anxiety, 62% reported they would not view the manager any differently, offering support where necessary, 35% reported their perceptions would not change greatly but they would be slightly wary around their manager going forward, and 3% reported viewing their manager as less professional or unfit to carry managerial status.

“I would love to be able to disclose my illness to my manager or colleagues from the outset, without them feeling that it makes me less capable of fulfilling my remit. It’s difficult how people don’t talk about mental illness and most often see it as
a weakness.”

  • 75% reported accurate perceptions of the statistical frequency of mental health difficulties, as 1 in every 4 individuals. 22% reported the statistical frequency of mental health difficulties to be 1 in every 5  individuals, and 4% reported the statistical frequency to be 1 in every 10 individuals.
  • 42% reported feeling ‘not very comfortable’ about discussing any mental health difficulties with an employer, and 8% reported feeling ‘not at all comfortable’ discussing this.
  • 58% reported being unaware of what resources were currently available to them to support their mental health in the workplace, 31% reported having a vague idea of the resources available to them, and 6% reported being fully aware of the resources available to them.

“It’s like a taboo subject that no one ever mentions or talks about. Especially in a pretty much all-male environment.”

  • When asked about the anticipated perceptions of themselves should they decide to share any current mental health difficulties with an employer, 24% reported expecting to be viewed no differently, 64% reported expecting to be viewed a little differently and more sensitively, and 12% reported expecting to be viewed as less capable or professional within their job.
  • 8% reported being unaware of what resources were currently available to them to support their mental health in the workplace, 31% reported having a vague idea of the resources available to them, and 6% reported being fully aware of the resources available to them.

“This stigma can be improved by colleagues being aware of the way it can affect me, and how it can impact my way of working. Saying it has no relevance to them, the way my work is carried out, is not something they can relate to, and saying there is nothing they can do about it has made me feel undervalued."

 

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